Got introduced to the Lift app by Tim Ferriss(via his random show). It’s essentially an app that allows you to check-in to some of the good habits you’d like to get used to, but you can also check-in to any task/label you’d like. For example, you want to floss daily? Add it as a habit and check-in whenever you floss. So far, I’ve added about 11 habits that range from drinking more water, to doing pushups, to working on a secret project. I think the key factor for this app is that it simply makes me remember that there are some stuff that I’d like to do today as a ritual, but not necessary stress my mind as to what those things are. Just open up the app and a list of the items are conveniently there for me to see, check off, and more importantly, remind me that I want to check them off.

20121218-000427.jpg
But onto the design of the app; there are some really interesting design patterns here, where I think crowd sourcing really comes into play. By default, and I think also by standard now, you’re introduced to a really nice welcome screen and login option. The design of the registration form is simple and clean(it accepts 1-letter last names — good) and it really makes you want to follow through to the next step. This is also aided by the fact that the registration is quick.

20121218-000441.jpg
Then you’re given an option to add some “good” habits. For me, there were about 5 items that I immediately wanted to add. This was all driven by the fact that the app had taxonomized choices of habits. Knowing that there were about 15K people that wanted to add flossing as part of their daily habit, made me want to add it as well.

It makes me think of how the app must have looked before people really started to use it? If the number was of users who wanted to floss had been 12 instead of 15,000 would that have made a difference? How much velocity would the habit addition page would have slowed down if the habits didn’t list such high numbers?

20121218-000537.jpg
The app is then followed by a sweet interface to check-in on the habit itself with a big round check mark that lights up when accomplished. Finally, a report of your checked off items can be seen and a report comes in your mail the following day, which re-energizes the cycle all over again.

There are a couple of lag/mis-communication issues that occur when going through the app and quickly adding and checking things off. Even over wifi it doesn’t seem like it’s really hitting the mark in this aspect. But overall, it’s not enough to prevent you from using it effectively.

Check it out if you feel like finding another way to remind yourself to do something you probably should be doing. For me, by entering in this blog entry I have checked off 7 items off of the list of 11!

Lift